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Ecological Section

Taneda, H [1], Tateno, M [1].

The criteria for biomass partitioning of the current shoot: water transport versus mechanical support.

The present study was performed to determine the theoretical criteria for biomass partitioning into the leaf and stem in the current shoot, using two qualitative models. The water transport model based on the biochemical model of CO2 assimilation predicts the relationship between the water transport capacity per biomass investment in the stem (stem mass specific conductivity) and the partitioning of biomass for maximizing shoot productivity. The mechanical support model based on Eulerís buckling formula predicts the relationship between the mechanical strength per biomass investment in the stem (inverse relationship of stem mass density) and the partitioning of biomass for avoiding mechanical failures such as lodging. These models predict stem properties (mass specific conductivity and stem mass density) for optimum partitioning that is just sufficient to provide static mechanical support and adequate water transport. The stem properties of actual plants differ from those predicted for optimum partitioning and indicate that the partitioning of biomass in the current shoot in both angiosperms and gymnosperms is basically governed by the mechanical support criterion, although gymnosperms probably shift to the water transport criterion. This tendency is supported by the biomass partitioning measured in actual plants.


1 - University of Tokyo, Graduate school of science, Nikko botanical gardens, 1842, Hanaishicho, Nikko, 321-1435, Japan

Keywords:
shoot
wood anatomy
hydraulic conductivity
Biomass Partitioning
mechanical strength.

Presentation Type: Poster
Session: 32-31
Location: Special Event Center (Cliff Lodge)
Date: Tuesday, August 3rd, 2004
Time: 12:30 PM
Abstract ID:196


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